How good is your grammar?

I read this article that 20 common grammar mistakes that everyone makes now and then.  Very insightful.  Some of them are pretty obvious, but I am still have problems trying to get a grip on “Lay and Lie”.

I’ve edited a monthly magazine for more than six years, and it’s a job that’s come with more frustration than reward. If there’s one thing I am grateful for — and it sure isn’t the pay — it’s that my work has allowed endless time to hone my craft to Louis Skolnick levels of grammar geekery.

As someone who slings red ink for a living, let me tell you: grammar is an ultra-micro component in the larger picture; it lies somewhere in the final steps of the editing trail; and as such it’s an overrated quasi-irrelevancy in the creative process, perpetuated into importance primarily by bitter nerds who accumulate tweed jackets and crippling inferiority complexes. But experience has also taught me that readers, for better or worse, will approach your work with a jaundiced eye and an itch to judge. While your grammar shouldn’t be a reflection of your creative powers or writing abilities, let’s face it — it usually is.

Below are 20 common grammar mistakes I see routinely, not only in editorial queries and submissions, but in print: in HR manuals, blogs, magazines, newspapers, trade journals, and even best selling novels. If it makes you feel any better, I’ve made each of these mistakes a hundred times, and I know some of the best authors in history have lived to see these very toadstools appear in print. Let’s hope you can learn from some of their more famous mistakes.

Who and Whom

This one opens a big can of worms. “Who” is a subjective — or nominative — pronoun, along with “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” and “they.” It’s used when the pronoun acts as the subject of a clause. “Whom” is an objective pronoun, along with “him,” “her,” “it”, “us,” and “them.” It’s used when the pronoun acts as the object of a clause. Using “who” or “whom” depends on whether you’re referring to the subject or object of a sentence. When in doubt, substitute “who” with the subjective pronouns “he” or “she,” e.g., Who loves you? cf., He loves me. Similarly, you can also substitute “whom” with the objective pronouns “him” or “her.” e.g., I consulted an attorney whom I met in New York. cf., I consulted him.

Which and That

This is one of the most common mistakes out there, and understandably so. “That” is a restrictive pronoun. It’s vital to the noun to which it’s referring.  e.g., I don’t trust fruits and vegetables that aren’t organic. Here, I’m referring to all non-organic fruits or vegetables. In other words, I only trust fruits and vegetables that are organic. “Which” introduces a relative clause. It allows qualifiers that may not be essential. e.g., I recommend you eat only organic fruits and vegetables, which are available in area grocery stores. In this case, you don’t have to go to a specific grocery store to obtain organic fruits and vegetables. “Which” qualifies, “that” restricts. “Which” is more ambiguous however, and by virtue of its meaning is flexible enough to be used in many restrictive clauses. e.g., The house, which is burning, is mine. e.g., The house that is burning is mine.

Link

Politics Singapore style

The opposition Workers Party has sacked one of its members YAW Shing Leong.  He is the MP for the single seat Hougang constituency.  As a result, a by election has to be called as an MP has to be a member of a party.

The sacking was due to Mr Yaw’s continued silence on his alleged affair with a married woman.  He was asked to explain to the Party’s Executive Committee, but failed to do so.

The full shebang here.

Wave Cloud

Wave cloud was observed in Florida.  It is called a Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (fluid dynamics).  Helmholtz or Hermann von Helmholtz also did some groundbreaking work in electromagnetism.

Click on the picture for the series of breath taking pictures.

Kelvin Helmholtz

 

Whitney Houston has passed away

Whitney Houston, a movie icon died in a hotel room with her entourage. Far cry from her days in the 80s.  She married rap artist Bobby Brown and subsequently there were rumours of rampant drug use.

LOS ANGELES –  The Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office said Sunday afternoon that an autopsy on pop icon Whitney Houston’s body has been completed, but official results have been placed on hold, pending toxicology tests.

Los Angeles Deputy Coroner Ed Winter said at a press conference that the tests could take six to eight weeks to process.

Winter added that the Beverly Hills Police Department had requested a “security hold” on the results of the coroner’s investigation, meaning no further details will be made available until the inquiry is complete.

He confirmed earlier comments made by police that “no foul play is suspected.”

He also confirmed that Houston was found Saturday afternoon in a bath tub in her room at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.

Prescription drugs had been found in the Beverly Hills Hilton hotel room where Houston’s lifeless body was discovered Saturday afternoon just hours before a huge Grammy party she was to attend.

link  TMZ

More ways to use Evernote

Evernote is a service where you store your notes.  You can enter notes from any smartphone, computers and browsers.  Pretty run of the mill stuff right?  It seems that it can do much much more.

September 18, 2009

Co-Founder, Alltop Recent Posts

I use a service called Evernote to fulfill my pack-rat and archiving needs. Evernote is a service “in the cloud” that you can dump notes, documents, photos, and tweets into for future access from any computer with Internet access. (Jennifer Van Grove also talks about it in her article.) Here are fourteen uses of Evernote that can help you organize, archive, and share information.

  1. Take notes. Taking notes in Evernote is way better than searching for that pad of paper that’s lost or at home. It’s also better than a text document on your computer because either you won’t remember the name of the document, you won’t have that computer, or you will have deleted the document inadvertently.
  2. Take pictures. Got into a fender bender? Take a picture of both cars, the other car’s license plates, and the other driver’s license. Drink a great bottle of wine? Take a picture of the label. See a book that you must read? Take a picture of the cover. Evernote has a great iPhone app that enables you to upload these pictures directly to your account.
  3. Save documents. When I receive a document (PowerPoint, Word, Excel, or PDF) that I’ll need again, I forward it to Evernote for safekeeping. This is easy because Evernote provides a unique email address to enter documents in your account. I do the same for pictures that people send me. This is very useful when you use more than one computer to create documents or send/receive email.
  4. Photograph business cards. Rather than collecting a pile of business cards that you’ll never go through, photograph them with your iPhone and send their images to Evernote. Evernote recognizes text on the card, so you can search for names such as “Apple” or “John” when that’s the only thing you can remember about the person. If you’re using Evernote on a mobile phone, it can also geotag the photo so that if you can only remember that you met the person in Cupertino, you can still find it. And you can save trees: When someone hands you her card, take a picture of it and hand it back.

 

Tip 11 on whiteboards, looks interesting.  Use the build in snapshot feature or attach a photo to a note.  Evernote will recognize the text and make it searchable.  There is no converted text though.

link